Lab Coordinator – Hayley Liebenow

Hayley graduated from Wellesley College with a BA in Psychology in 2019. Before joining our lab, she worked as a Research Assistant for Harvard University’s Reach Every Reader Project, working with preschool children and their parents to improve literacy in low-income families, as well as working with patients with hoarding disorder at Riverside Community Care. Hayley is interested in how gender and socioeconomic status affects children’s math acquisition. Hayley also enjoys listening to jazz music, figure skating, and journaling.


Lab Coordinator – Lesenia Fish

Lesenia graduated from the University of Wisconsin – Madison with a BS in Psychology and Neurobiology in 2018. Her previous experience includes working with rhesus macaques in the Saalmann Lab and working with children in the Social Kids Lab at UW – Madison. Lesenia is interested in topics in social psychology and plans to pursue a PhD in that field. She enjoys spending time in nature, trying new coffee shops, and playing trivia.


Postdoc – Stacee Santos

Stacee is interested in how the limited access to sound and language influences cognitive development. Her research investigates different numerical concepts with deaf and hard of hearing children. These studies explore how children with hearing loss discriminate between different amounts, recognize shapes, understand quantities, space, and proportion. Stacee received her Ph.D. from Boston College in 2008 where her research focused on the cognitive benefits of physical activity and complex motor learning.

Graduate Student – Lindsey Hildebrand

Lindsey is broadly interested in attitudes and beliefs about STEM and gender as well as the development of spatial and numerical cognition. More specifically, Lindsey’s work investigates how children and adults think about math and spatial abilities, with a focus on the emergence, consequences, and mitigation of gender stereotypes about these academic domains. Additionally, Lindsey is interested in the relations between perceptions of ability (i.e. confidence) and actual ability and how others use these ability-related cues across an array of contexts.